Publications in Economics & Social Policy

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24 November 2015 | Budgeting for Balance: How hard is this going to be?

By Jonathan Dupont

  • Together, a decade of loose public spending, fiscal stimulus and the aftermath of the financial crisis left Britain with the highest deficit in its post war history at 10.2% of GDP. Even half a decade later, that deficit is only half closed, and remains high internationally. Budgeting for Balance looks at the experience of fiscal consolidation so far, and how to approach the remainder of the task.

  • 12 November 2015 | Whitehall Rules! Improving pay and performance in the Civil Service

    By Damian Hind

  • Whitehall Rules! shows how the Government could save £1 billion over the next four years by cutting the amount it currently spends on contractors by just 25%. In 2014/15, Government departments spent £1.01 billion on external contractors, up from £610 million in 2011/12.

  • 17 August 2015 | On the Move: How to create a more mobile workforce

    By Damian Hind

  • On the Move shows how making it easier for people – especially those on low incomes – to commute just a little bit further each day can put them in touch of thousands of extra potential jobs. Proposals from the report for doing so include tax benefits for ride-sharing schemes, introducing part-time rail tickets and devolution rail franchising and commercial bus subsidy.

  • 05 March 2015 | No Worker Left Behind: How to improve pay and work for the low paid

    By Jonathan Dupont

  • No Worker Left Behind calls for every person in full time work to receive a 'Living Income' - enough money after taxes and benefits to provide a socially-acceptable standard of living. We can do so by aligning and raising National Insurance and Income tax thresholds to a level where a person on full time work on the minimum wage would be taken out of tax altogether.

  • 24 February 2015 | Economics Manifesto

    By Jonathan Dupont

  • The Economics Manifesto says that the next government should seek to create a capital-owning democracy for all, so that each and every person in the UK can benefit from economic growth. The report proposes mass distribution of RBS and Lloyds’ shares, compulsory savings, the introduction of a  Bonus Isa and a new generation of private sector Premium Bonds.

  • 24 February 2015 | The Central Contradiction of Capitalism? A collection of essays on Capital in the Twenty-First Century

    Edited by Geoffrey Wood and Steve Hughes

  • This essay collection collates some of the most thought provoking assessments of Thomas Piketty’s book Capital in the Twenty-First Century, and publishes some new ones for the first time.

  • 03 February 2015 | Welfare Manifesto

    By Guy Miscampbell, Steve Hughes

  • The Welfare Manifesto shows how to make the welfare system fit for the 21st Century. The report sets out principles to be make the system simpler, more effective, fairer, more affordable, and reward contribution.

  • 16 January 2015 | Bonus ISAs

    By Steve Hughes

  • Bonus ISAs proposes a new scheme to give people more flexibility to build up their tax-free savings pots during the course of a lifetime. The "Bonus ISA" would be offered to anybody who is unable to use their full annual tax-free savings allowance (currently set at £15,000). People would be given the power to roll over any unused portions of their existing ISA allowances into their Bonus ISA account.

  • 15 October 2014 | Making Contributions Count: Reforms to create a social security system for the 21st Century

    By Steve Hughes

  • Making Contributions Count proposes a new unemployment insurance scheme which will put personal contribution at the heart of the welfare system. The scheme would see people who have worked hard and paid their taxes able to draw from a contributory pot to provide a greater level of out of work support if they need it. Upon retirement, the contributions would be released as part of an individual's pension package, which could see people who worked all their lives receiving in excess of £10,000.

  • 10 October 2014 | Work 2.0: Helping the hardest to help: targeted assistance, incentives and the Work Programme

    By Ed Holmes

  • Work 2.0 provides a blueprint for how the Work Programme – the government’s flagship welfare-to-work policy – should be improved, including ideas on how to better assess jobseeker needs, how to integrate the Programme into the structures of Universal Credit, and how to better recognise local labour market conditions.

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